Awareness can be translated to being Conscious and informed. Awareness means, that individuals and collectives/systems are sensitized, to build up consciousness for crossing other’s boundaries. All forms of discrimination and violence (physical and verbal) can play a role, but it also involves the sensitivity towards the well-being of individuals.

The goal of awareness work is to ensure that all individuals feel as free and safe as possible, regardless of their gender, sexual orientation, skin color, origin, appearance, age and physical abilities. Boundary Crossing Situations and violence should be prevented in advance by raising awareness of structures and reflecting on them.

If they occur, there will be trained staff, to whom affected individuals can turn to for counseling, support, and potentially assitance. 

Discrimination means, that individuals  are systematically prevented from exercising their human rights based on individual or group-specific characteristics. . The concept of discrimination in the General Equal Treatment Act (AGG) in Germany is based on its effect, not the motive.

Discrimination means that individuals are systematically prevented from exercising their human rights based on individual or group-specific characteristics. The concept of discrimination in the General Equal Treatment Act (AGG) in Germany is based on its effect, not the motive. It does not matter whether a treatment was carried out from a hostile or derogatory attitude or whether the disadvantage is simply the unintended consequence of a certain regulation for the existence of a disadvantage.

For the existence of a disadvantage, it does not matter whether a treatment was carried out from a hostile or derogatory attitude or whether the disadvantage is simply the unintended consequence of a certain regulation.

In practice, discrimination can take various forms:
Differentiation – for example, when BIPoC are systematically targeted by police controls. 
Exclusion – for example, when people are rejected at club doors due to their identity. 
Restriction – for example, when LGBTQIA+ individuals are denied freedom of assembly. 
Favoritism – for example, when German citizens are preferred in housing allocation.
Segregation – for example, when Rom:nja children are systematically taught in separate schools or classes without considering their abilities and needs.
Denial of reasonable accommodation – for example, when buildings are not wheelchair accessible.

Here is a (certainly incomplete) list of possible forms of discrimination:

Ableism: Discrimination against individuals based on their abilities. 

Ageism: Discrimination against individuals based on their age, including perceived youthfulness or older age. 

Antisemitism: Discrimination against Jewish people. 

Fatphobia: Discrimination against individuals who are overweight.

Xenophobia: Discrimination against people perceived as “different,” often directed by white people towards foreigners and/or BIPOC individuals. 

Homo-hostility: Discrimination against homosexual people. This term should be used instead of homophobia, as phobia implies that homophobic individuals have a rational reason to be homophobic because they are “just afraid.” 

Islamophobia: Discrimination against people who practice Islam. 

Classism: Discrimination based on finances, lifestyle, environment, living space, and education.

Queerphobia: Discrimination against queer people, often targeting those who are not cisgender and/or heterosexual. 

Racism: Discrimination, oppression, and colonization of BIPOC individuals. Racism refers to any discrimination based on race, skin color, ancestry, national origin, or ethnicity. 

Sexism: Discrimination against individuals based on their assigned gender. Sexism is particularly evident in the marginalization of female-identified individuals, women, trans, non-binary, and intersex people.

Black, Indigenous, and People of Color – short: BIPOC – is a self-designation for people who have experienced racism. 

The binary (western) gender system assumes, that there are only two genders, male and woman. It does not allow other genders or immediate stages. 

Heteronormativity describes a binary gender system that is exclusively based on men and women, who are hierarchically related to each other (man over woman) and associated with certain characteristics.

The prefix “cis” refers to a person who lives in alignment with the gender assigned to them at birth. For example, a cis woman was assigned female at birth and also identifies herself as a woman.

The abbreviation stands for women, lesbian, intersex, non-binary, trans, and agender individuals. It encompasses all people who are discriminated in patriarchal systems.

Inclusion means that every person is inherently part the society, accepted, and able to participate autonomously. An inclusive society explicitly recognizes diversity as an enrichment – it is normal to be different.

Intersectionality describes how multiple forms of discrimination can simultaneously and intersectingly affect an individual. These forms of discrimination can never be viewed in isolation, they are always interconnected with each other.